The Nightshift: 27 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Thursday, 27 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift: the world’s overnight news feed.

The White House rolled out their long awaited tax plan on Wednesday. It was delivered on one page, in bullet point form. Lots of implications, little definition. The bottom line is that the number of personal tax brackets will be reduced from 7 to 3 and many deductions dropped (mortgage interest will remain); a new corporate tax rate is proposed at 15%. There will be a reduction in taxes collected but the thinking is that the tax changes will stimulate economic growth and the enlarged economic base will make up for the reduction in rates. Not so fast say some others with more experience in this area of economics; the thinking is that betting on something to happen (i.e. higher growth) does not have the same economic certainty as knowing something will happen. The proposal is off to Congress now for debate and refinement. It’s already under fire for benefiting the wealthy and possibly increasing the deficit if things don’t go as planned (no matter who’s in office, things never go as planned). Trump also postponed plans to withdraw from NAFTA and deferred the first round of action on “The Wall” until later in the year.

The U.S. is ramping up diplomatic efforts to encourage China to pull North Korea back from brinksmanship. Perhaps it will work. The alternative (unilateral action by the U.S.) is not an attractive option.

Athletic wear maker Under Armour watched its stock surge as it announced a smaller loss than anticipated yesterday, thus winning by losing. United Airlines is still dealing with the fallout from their passenger “re-accommodation” episode; now they’re proposing offering up to $10,000 to passengers willing to give up their seats on overbooked flights.

The Boston Celtics beat the Chicago Bulls last night to take a 3-2 lead in their playoff series; Chicago once lead the series and now it’s slipping away. ESPN created headlines instead of reporting them by firing 100 staffers, including on-air personalities, producers, writers, contributors, and online contributors. ESPN is being stressed by overpaying for sports rights (i.e. NBA) and cord cutting.

Film director Jonathan Demme has died; he won an Oscar for “Silence of the Lambs” but many will remember him best for his terrific concert film “Stop Making Sense” which featured the Talking Heads.

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1083 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. p


The Nightshift: 26 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Wednesday, 26 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift: the world’s overnight news feed.

It’s go time in Washington as the White House organizes and outlines multiple agenda items, from tax cuts to another shot at Trumpcare. Will these items be finished before the “100 day” mark is up? Doubtful. Too much debate and fine tuning to be completed. Trump has criticized the “arbitrary” 100 day achievement guide(he’s not doing well by that metric) and he has a point. There’s another point though: that Presidencies end up the way they start out. If a new administration can’t push through key agenda items during its’ “honeymoon” phase (1st 100 days), how well can they do when the shine is off?  Trump’s running an unconventional White House. Maybe he will be the exception.

Former NSC head Mike Flynn–who resigned after the shortest tenure in the job in history–may not have fully disclosed all of the income and connections he had with Turkey and Russia prior to his selection to join the Trump administration. Flynn, who said he had a “story to tell” and would tell it if granted immunity, is going in the wrong direction to avoid serious legal issues.

Fox News, which has had its share of legal adventures, is now in the crosshairs of a racial discrimination lawsuit. The channel, which ruled cable news for over a decade, is facing a rebuilding period. Power and influence are diminishing at a high rate and in a series of very messy public relations nightmares.

Twitter posted unexpected increases in earnings and subscribers, boosting the stock.Overseas, luxury fashion conglomerate LVMH is taking over Dior in a $13.0+ billion deal.

Robert Pirsig, who wrote the surprising classic “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” has died at the age of 88. It’s a very good read and well worth your time.

Disney has announced projected release dates for some of their most popular films–the latest installments of “Star Wars”, “Frozen”, and “The Lion King”. Looks like 2019 will be a big year for Disney blockbusters.

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1082 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. p


The Nightshift: 25 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Tuesday, 25 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift: the world’s overnight news feed.

The White House is pushing a very large agenda of items in an effort to get something major on the books before the first 100 days are up this weekend. From initial reports, it looks like a very difficult if not impossible task. Trump is going to push for a 15% corporate tax. That may not go down well with Congress.

French centrist Presidential candidate Macron has been the victim of Russian hacking. Does this scenario sound familiar?

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1081 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. p


The Nightshift: 24 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Monday, 24 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift: the world’s overnight news feed.

The first round of the French elections are over and two candidates, novice political aspirant Emmanuel Macron (sound familiar?) and right winger Marine Le Pen (another familiar position to Americans), took the top two spots. They will face a runoff to be held on May 7th, just two weeks away, to determine the next leader of France.

This is a big week for the White House. New bills on Trumpcare, Tax Reform, and that Wall are expected to arrive in Congress. There’s also the government funding issue which the White House has decided to tie to the fate of the wall. Hmmmm.   Unless this new round of legislation is much better reasoned and detailed than the last round, expect these initiatives to be D.O.A. Trump’s first hundred days are winding down and there’s little chance of much of substance being accomplished but he’s going to “double down” to see if he can’t get something, anything, done. Approval ratings continue to drop to historic lows. As my old tennis coach used to say, “change a losing game”.

In business, Japanese electronics/entertainment giant SONY is reporting its’ best results since 1998. That’s a good thing: we need SONY. SONY is the dominant supplier of most commercial television equipment (SONY 4K HD cameras equipped with CANON lenses is a very, very good combo) and who doesn’t remember how the Walkman enabled us to enjoy music anywhere. American Airlines is dealing with its’ own passenger mis-handling incident and this one is almost as ugly as United’s.  This is the week Bill O’Reilly was expected back at Fox News–but he’s not coming back. The other cable news outlets couldn’t be happier; they will take advantage of his absence to build their own audiences.

The Boston Celtics evened their series with the Chicago Bulls at 2-2 and are back in the game in the Eastern Conference NBA playoffs. Houston’s Rocket’s beat the Oklahoma City Thunder to take a 3-1 lead in that series; Oklahoma is lead by fearless, force-of-nature Russell Westbrook, but he can’t do it all by himself. Westbrook had a triple double by the end of the first half–he’s that good. But it wasn’t enough. Steve Kerr, the superb coach of the Golden State Warriors, will miss game 4 of the current Golden State/Portland series and may miss the rest of the playoffs due to complications from back surgery. Kerr is one of the good guys in the game; let’s hope he can recover enough to lead the Warriors–a team he built and coached to greatness–through the NBA playoffs. As Kerr says, do everything you can to avoid back surgery–it never seems to work out, especially for people who are/were very active.  And finally, Lionel Messi, the very best player in soccer,  scored the winning goal in overtime in the El Clasico soccer match between Barcelona and Real Madrid. Despite being roughed up during the game (Messi had dental surgery after the game), he scored two goals and dominated play.

And that’s it for Monday morning….

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file.  They remain the internet’s go-to source for photos.  This visual has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1080 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. 


The Nightshift: 23 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings: 

Good Morning,  It’s Sunday, 23 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift: the world’s overnight news feed.

The French elections are on today. Will France go left, right, or down the middle. There are implications not only for France but for the Euro, migration of refugees, and the European Union. The election results will be heavily reported on the net and networks.

The U.S. Government is facing a shutdown next week while the Trump administration is set to push a new and controversial agenda of tax reform and yet another shot at Trumpcare. Trump is facing judgement day–his first 100 days report card–with lots of negative press. His base still holds.

There is also a growing sense in Washington that enough is enough from Wikileaks and the organization should be classified as a terrorist group and legal action should be taken against the group and its’ leader, Julian Assange.

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1080 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. 


The Nightshift: 22 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Saturday, 22 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift: the world’s overnight news feed.

President Trump has announced plans to bring tax reform before Congress as early as next week, as well as to re-boot Trumpcare. All very ambitious undertakings that may or may not be ready for prime time. If both initiatives go down, the Trump agenda will really suffer.

All quiet, temporarily, on the Korean Peninsula.

The French elections are this weekend. By tomorrow evenging, there could be an entirely new political mood in the country with a right wing candidate currently gaining strength.

A familiar international problem–Greece and its shaky financial status–is stirring up rumors again. Another international bailout on the horizon?

American fast food chain Subway has announced it’s closing hundreds of stores. The chain expanded dramatically in the past decade, but sales growth has slowed (over expansion?) and the decision has been made to reduce the number of outlets.

Another major American company, IHEARTRADIO, the country’s largest operator of radio stations (and billboards, through Clear Channel) has announced that it may not survive another year. The problem is the  $20 Billion dollars in debt used to acquire stations and build the group in a massive leveraged buyout lead by major private equity firms.  CEO Bob Pittman (ex-MTV) may have to go down with the ship.

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1079 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. 


The Nightshift: 21 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Friday, 21 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift: the world’s overnight news feed.

A terrorist gunman, Karim Cheurfi, used an AK-47 to kill one policeman and wound two others in Paris on Thursday. The attack took place on the Champs Elysee, perhaps the most famous street in the world. Cheurfi had served time in French prisons before. He was on a terror watchlist and been arrested as recently as February, when he was picked for attempting to obtain weapons to be used to kill police. He was released. The French internal security forces will have to answer some very difficult questions about how someone who was known to them, known to be radicalized, actively involved in trying to commit a terrorist act, was allowed to roam free in French society. With the French presidential election this weekend, the shooting could be the final tipping point to send France into a right wing posture. The ultimate victim is going to be some measure of individual freedom, as countries from Sweden to France to Germany, will not continue to be legally tolerant of those under terror watch (“innocent until proven guilty” switches to “guilty”) and will instead arrest suspected terrorists and detain them, perhaps permanently.

The media was in a feeding frenzy yesterday as the stories about Bill O’Reilly’s departure from Fox News hit the wires. O’Reilly’s drama is  very well known by now–no need to revisit–but he was not exactly kicked to the curb, leaving a network that made him wealthy (and vice versa) with a $25M severance check. He was in the first year of a new contract that he will not be able to run out. Apparently, when Fox negotiated the new agreement they put an “exit clause” in it, knowing that the storm clouds were gathering and O’Reilly could go down in a nasty, ugly way (which he did). So what’s next for Bill O? A non-compete of unknown length will probably keep him off the TV airwaves  and maybe radio as well. He joins Fox News founder and major domo Roger Ailes on the airwave sidelines–think those guys could raise the money for a new network? You betcha. A very public mea culpa tour, an apology (“rightly or wrongly, I have been accused of things I did not do, but in an effort to put it in the past, I apologize to anyone I might have unintentionally offended…”), some time in the background to let the dust and subpoenas settle, and then back to it. Or maybe, just maybe, both of those gentlemen will come to the conclusion that they have done all they want and call it a career. Except for the endings, they had an incredible run. We shall see.

It’s a little quieter in Far East as North Korea–after one last comical threat–has been convinced by someone to cool it. Who’s applying the pressure? China? The U.S.? Russia? All of the above? Some type of solution needs to be developed, but one thing is certain: the U.S. is not going to let an erratically governed, confrontational state like North Korea obtain the capacity to fire off nuclear tipped missiles at America, Japan or South Korea. The truth: if there’s going to be a confrontation with North Korea, it’s going to take place there, on the peninsula. Senator Lindsey Graham made that point in interviews yesterday, acknowledging that South Korea would/could absorb the brunt of the damage if a war breaks out due to North Korea’s increasingly belligerent posture. The realities of the modern world include some very blunt assessments about who gets damaged and who doesn’t. Not a happy circumstance for anyone.

Tiger Woods, at one time the very best professional golfer in the world, has had another back surgery; this one, his fourth, was to treat continuing pain in his back. With every surgery, the chances of Woods ever playing golf professionally again diminish and his possibilities for contending for major titles become even more remote. He’s relatively young, he’s wealthy and famous, and it’s over.

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file.  They remain the internet’s go-to source for photos.  This visual has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1077 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. 


“Money doesn’t make you happy. It just makes you unhappy in a better part of town….”

--David Siegel (aka "The Time Share King")

The Nightshift: 20 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Thursday, 20 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

It’s over at Fox News. Bill O’Reilly, cables top news personality, is out and will not “be returning to the show”. No way to spin the problems in the “No Spin Zone”. O’Reilly was brought very publicly down by a massive onslaught of sexual harassment charges–the same type of problem that forced his boss and the founder of Fox News, Roger Ailes, out last year. O’Reilly’s problems had already forced Fox to make $13 million in payouts. O’Reilly has said the allegations are part of a vast plot to undermine him by liberal media. Right. Spin it. From the reports leaking out about the case, it appears that O’Reilly undermined himself. His loss to the business of Fox News will be massive. because O’Reilly’s show contributed 10% of the revenues and 25% of the operating income for the company. Despite the allegations–which Bill O’Reilly calls “unfounded”–his audience remained loyal and was continuing to grow. Anyway it’s parsed, this is a major change in the media landscape and it deprives the conservative right with perhaps their most effective on-air spokesperson. What type of change will that bring about in the American political landscape?

China is ramping up pressure on North Korea to stop all the trash talk and bellicose actions; this is coming at the same time that the U.S. is moving a naval contingent into the area (it’s there somewhere) doing some trash talking of its own. From China’s viewpoint, maybe North Korea has outlived their usefulness. China is North Korea’s major trading partner–what little North Korea has to trade–and has been backing increasingly erratic North Korean regimes for decades. But the reality of the situation is that China is not going to risk their economic growth and world influence for a country that doesn’t have anything to offer anyone but trouble.

And, as if North Korea and Syria weren’t enough of a problem, the administration is now talking tough (again) about the Iran Nuclear Deal. Might want to set that one aside for a while, because there are plenty of other simmering hotspots that require attention.

Former NFL player Aaron Hernandez, convicted of one murder and acquitted in two others, committed suicide in prison in Massachusetts, less than 10 days after winning a legal victory in the double murder charges.  There were the inevitable questions from family and friends about the circumstances of his death.  He was serving life in prison without parole on the murder conviction.

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file.  They remain the internet’s go-to source for photos.  This visual has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1075 for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world. 


The Nightshift: 18 April 2017


Editor’s Note: The Nightshift will be published in abbreviated form for the next couple of weeks due to outside scheduling commitments. Weekend editions will be full-pack, but weekday commentary will be very streamlined. 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning,  It’s Tuesday, 18 April 2017, and this is the Morning Edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

The North Korean situations remains flammable and tense. Vice President Mike Pence is in Japan for talks with the Japanese about the situation. Anyway you look at it….it’s a mess.

Voters are turning out to have better memories than the people they elected. The voters are actually expecting their elected reps, from the Presidency on down, to fulfill their campaign promises. Good luck with that, but there will be repercussions. The First 100 days are coming to a close and looking pretty forgettable.

The U.K. Prime Minister is scheduling an early vote to get the Brexit movement in progress. Now, reality is sinking in.

Now more than ever, catch up on the news in the rest of the world by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest newspapers.

And–don’t forget that today’s the day to file your 2016 Income Taxes.

Don’t forget that both Politico.com and Bloomberg.com have been added to our go-to news resources.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips. Have a great week.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

The Fine Print:  The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1074  for this site. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.