UA-114816548-1

Nightshift Sports: U.S.Open 2018, Final Results

 

The Golden Season of Classic Sports: U.S.Open 2018
Embed from Getty Images
And so it’s over. The 2018 U.S.Open ended with a soon-t0-be-very familiar name at the top of the leaderboard followed closely by another hot young golfer on the way up.

The winner of this year’s U.S.Open–the man who best navigated all four days of a treacherous course and unpredictable weather–is, amazingly, the very same man who laid wasted to the cupcake course setup last year, winning the 2017 Open with a 16 under par score. That would be Brooks Koepka, who joins a very short list of golfing greats (six in all, including Curtis Strange, Bobby Jones, and Ben Hogan)  who have won the U.S.Open in back-to-back outings.

The irony of Koepka’s win is stunning: the massive under-par score he posted at last year’s open at Erin Hills was the impetus behind the USGA, the organizing and sanctioning body behind the U.S.Open, making the decision to toughen up the course this year and make it a lot more difficult for the golfers. That they did.

Koepka was one over for the tournament. The runner up, Tommy Fleetwood, who posted a very low 63 on the closing day, was two over. In winning on both one of the easiest courses ever set up for a U.S. Open (Erin Hills) and one of the hardest (Shinnecock Hills), Koepka displayed a range of ability that sets him apart from most of the current crop of pros. A really good professional golfer should be really good on all types of courses–we expect it from them and they expect from themselves–but that’s not always how it ends up.

Dustin Johnson, who entered the weekend with a four stroke lead, couldn’t close it out. Tommy Fleetwood, who shot the lowest round of the tournament couldn’t push it over into a win (but he could be very dangerous at The British Open).

Golf’s traditional go-to guys for big wins has a new name: Koepka. As for the old favorites–Speith, Rose, Thomas, Day, Reed, Woods–they’re going to have to get back in the groove. Like the rest of the world, everything is changing in golf and if you’re not moving forward, you’re going backward.

Next up: The British Open.

Below: the wrap up of the 2018 U.S.Open.

Final Leaderboard

New York Times Coverage

Washington Post Coverage

NBC Coverage of US Open

SportsNation Coverage of US Open

USGA

What’s in the bag: Brooks Koepka’s clubs.

 

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at GettyImages.com, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not be altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. Nightshift Sports is produced by Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker . Thanks guys! All rights not expressly reserved by others are copyright (c) 2018, donald pierce. Thanks for reading. 

 

 


The Nightshift: World News 18 June 2018

Press Clippings
Embed from Getty Images
Good Morning, it’s Monday, 18  June 2018  and this is the Morning edition of The Nightshift, the international news daily.

People, places, and events for today:

Immigration Separation

Brooks Koepka

Oil

World Cup

Rupert Stadler/Audi

Henri Jayer Wine Sale

 

Today is National Splurge Day. It’s also National Go Fishing Day (shouldn’t that have been held on the weekend?). Combine them and splurge on fishing gear.

The Front Page Links

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Boston Globe (Boston)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

The Local (Oslo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel

CNN News Text Site

Ars Technica  

Agence France-Presse

McClatchy DC Bureau

Xinua

UPI

Oil Prices Dot Com

The Fine Print. Embed courtesy of our friends at GettyImages.com, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This image has not been altered in anyway. We thank GettyImages.com for sharing. This post is number 1823 for this site (we’ve been busy overnight). The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications and is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. It’s rapid iteration within a surprisingly wide bandwidth. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.

 

 


Nightshift Sports: U.S. Open 2018, Final Round

 

The Golden Season of Classic Sports: U.S.Open 2018
Embed from Getty Images

Saturday was “moving day” at the U.S. Open, but most of the moving was backwards, not forward. Dustin Johnson dropped from a four stroke lead into a tie with three other golfers (Daniel Berger, Tony Finau, Brooks Koepka); Phil Mickelson had a moment on the greens (he also went 11 over par for the day, currently is at +15 ), Ian Poulter who started the day at +1 ended it at seven over par and, understandably frustrated, trash-talked the USGA for the course setup and the conduct of the fans (they cheered when he hit bad shots–maybe a sign of how much Poulter has gotten under their skins during his bi-annual Ryder Cup appearances, where he has blistered the U.S. in match play).

So–Saturday was brutal. The USGA has said they will try to “soften” up the greens a bit, to enable shots that hit the green to stay there but the personality of this U.S.Open is already set, and last day course setup changes are not going to alter the way the fans view the 2018 event. It’s been wild, very hard, excruciatingly difficult, nuts, zany, unpredictable and–for the casual golf fan–a lot of fun to watch.

Not so much fun for the guys who play golf for a living but..since when is it the job of the tournament organizers–especially at one of the four times a year “majors”– to make it easy on the players? Just play, please, and STFU. OK, you’re going to shoot high–the key to winning is control, and not shooting higher than anyone else. If you’re one of the very lucky few who’s living the dream out on the tour, don’t complain when you hit a nightmare once in a while. Goes with dreamland.

Fox’s coverage of the tournament has been improved, but they still haven’t brought their A game to golf. One of their touted improvements–a ball flight tracker (Trackman) on every hole did not materialize in the first three days.  It wasn’t even present on each shot from a threesome on the tee. More work to do there and the commentators, while professional, are not yet inspired. Jim Nance is a tough act to follow.

The tournament ends today and who knows what crazy things will happen today. One thing’s for sure–this tournament is not a walkover like last year’s minus 16 strokes win by Koepka. The golfer with the ability to play to what the course requires vs. what he likes to do is going to be the one who wins.

Stay tuned. All the information on how to do that is below. And Happy Father’s Day.

Current Leaderboard

New York Times Coverage

Washington Post Coverage

SportsNation Coverage of US Open

How to Watch The US Open

US Open Radio

USGA

 

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at GettyImages.com, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not be altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. Nightshift Sports is produced by Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker . Thanks guys! All rights not expressly reserved by others are copyright (c) 2018, donald pierce. Thanks for reading. 

 

 


The Nightshift: World News 17 June 2018

 

Press Clippings
Embed from Getty Images
Good Morning, it’s Sunday, 17  June 2018  and this is the Morning edition of The Nightshift, the international news daily.

People, places, and events for today:

Toyota/Le Mans

Migrant Ships

German Border Closings

Apple/Oprah Winfrey

US Open

China/US Trade War

 

Today is Father’s Day. Celebrate with/for your father and if you are a father, celebrate with your family.

The Front Page Links

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Boston Globe (Boston)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

The Local (Oslo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel

CNN News Text Site

Ars Technica  

Agence France-Presse

McClatchy DC Bureau

Xinua

UPI

Oil Prices Dot Com

The Fine Print. Embed courtesy of our friends at GettyImages.com, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This image has not been altered in anyway. We thank GettyImages.com for sharing. This post is number 1821 for this site (we’ve been busy overnight). The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications and is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. It’s rapid iteration within a surprisingly wide bandwidth. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.

 

 


Daybreak at Le Mans

Nightshift Sports:
Embed from Getty Images
The Golden Season for the Classic Sports: Le Mans 2018

The 24 Hours of Le Mans  is currently in progress. The race started Saturday afternoon and will finish this afternoon(Sunday).  The teams who have come through the night unscathed (and many did not) now face the daunting prospect that a third of the race is yet to be run. This piece was originally published as part of Nightshift Sports coverage of the 2017 24 Hours of Le Mans. It’s just as relevant today because it addresses a specific time in a 24 hour endurance race, and not a specific race. Races are lost and fortunes are changed during the night at Le Mans; of particular note is the jeopardy cars find themselves in during the very early morning hours……

“In a 24 hour endurance race, it’s only 24 hours for the car. For the crew and drivers, it’s a minimum of 32 or 36 or even 48 hours.”–Miles Geauxbye

Daybreak.

There is a trick that the night/day cycle plays on participants in around-the-clock, 24 hour endurance races.

It is called Sunrise and although the racers naturally feel that racing into the sunrise means the end of the race is very near, that is not the case.

The legendary 24 Hour races start in early afternoon, at 2:00 or 3:00 or 4:00PM and when a team makes it to sunrise–safely and still in the game–there is still approximately a third of the race to left to go. That’s a significant amount of time to continue racing, after both car and drivers and crew are exhausted.

Sunrise is a signal that, having made it through the night, you are now simultaneously required to do many things: turn up the wick to close strongly and keep it all together on the track and in the pits so nothing derails your run to the finish line.

Go fast, but don’t go recklessly.

Do your very best work on the track and off at the precise time of day at which you are the most compromised in terms of energy, attention, strength, focus, because you have been up all night and working longer than that.

Sunrise is a marker of progress but it’s also a false horizon: you might think you’re almost there, but you’re not.

You made to morning. Congratulations.

But a third of the race is yet to be run, and this is–like all of the race–yet another strategic point.

The next goal is to make it to twelve noon, the point at which –at Le Mans–you have three hours left.

And once you make it to twelve, you get to turn up the wick and race full blast all the way to the end of the race.

Enjoy the sunrise. But it’s not the natural end to the race, just the unnatural beginning of the end.

The Fine Print: Image embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. The image has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. Text (c) 2017, 2018 Donald Pierce. 


Into The Night

Nightshift Sports

The Golden Season for Classic Sports: Le Mans 2018 

Embed from Getty Images
“Night, the beloved.  Night, when words fade and things come alive.  When the destructive analysis of day is done, and all that is truly important becomes whole and sound again.  When man reassembles his fragmentary self and grows with the calm of a tree.”  ~Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

 

Antoine de Saint-Exupery was the author of the Novella “The Little Prince”, the book used for my class textbook when I first learned French and a classic of literature. Saint-Exupery was a brilliant writer, an early and expert aviator in the days when flying meant that every journey in an airplane was hazardous to your health because of the lack of instruments (and radios, and GPS, and almost every modern flight assistance aid we take for granted today). St.-Ex learned to fly in the Military, was convinced to abandon that career by his financee and her family, but ultimately, after a tedious year or two at a desk job in Paris, he was back in the air, free and confident and soaring. He became one of the pioneers of international postal flight, working for AEROPOSTALE on the treacherous route between Toulouse and Dakar.

 

Saint-Exupery was a complicated, multi-dimensional man of accomplishment, unquestioned bravery, and literary elegance. While his best known book in America is “The Little Prince”, his true genius as a writer can be found in his books on aviation. Vol de Nuit (Night Flight), which recounted his adventures in Aeropostale, won the Prix Femina, a prestigious French literary award. Terre Des Hommes (Wind, Sand and Stars) another book on aviation, is considered a classic in aviation literature.

 

Flying at night and driving at speed, at night, have similar qualities and challenges. The territory, as familiar as it may be in the day, is different at night. Focus is directed by the path in front; there is much less room for error because the ability to see clearly, definitively into the distance is diminished. If there is an error, and the car or airplane goes out of control—even for a second—the situation that aviators call “unusual attitude” is all the more difficult to recover from.

 

And yet, deep into the night there is a comforting rhythm enjoyed by drivers and pilots. The consistent, reassuring sound of the engine. The timed ritual of the gear change or throttle increase (or decrease); the beauty of the flashes of light that rush by; the peace of speed at night on the Mulsanne straight, when you are the only car on the road and your headlights beam your destiny.

 

At this time in the race, the Zen of existence makes it appearance. You must not live in the future, you dare not live in the past. You must realize, accept, and be in the present. There is only this moment in the dark, only the next curve, the next braking zone, the next shift up or down to deal with you. If you will ever bond with a racing car, you will do it at night, when it is just the two of you, alone, at speed, at Le Mans, in the middle of the night. And it is all working and the welcome relief of light to some is an interruption of a dream for others.

The dark of night is giving way to the light of day and still the distance yet to go is daunting for the cars running at the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans.

But the night has refreshed the course, the car, and the team.

And now the run for daylight begins.

The Fine Print: Image embed courtesy of our friends at GettyImages.com, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This image has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. Nightshift Sports is produced by Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker for The Nightshift, the World News Daily. Text copyright (c)2018, donald pierce.


How to Race at the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans

Nightshift Sports
Embed from Getty Images
The Golden Season of Classics Sports: Le Mans 2018

The 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race is running this weekend. If you want to race in –or know what it takes to race in–one of the most famous races in the world, then you need to know the rules. The ACO (Automobile Club de L’Ouest, the organizing body for Le Mans), revises the rules every year.

Here’s your link to the 2018 rules, which are run in combination with the FIA and WEC (Word Endurance Championship)Pay particular attention to the Sporting Regulations and also to the technical regulations for the racing class you’re most interested in following.

There are different rules for each of the four classes at Le Mans and they are rather complex. Check them out when you go to the “sporting regulations” link (above).

The site where the rules are posted, which is the main site for the race, is a great resource.

Nightshift Sports will be following the 24 Hours of Le Mans race over the weekend.

The Fine Print: Images/embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the entire photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. We thank them for sharing. No photographs have been altered. Nightshift Sports is produced by Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker exclusively for The Nightshift (the world news daily). All rights not expressly reserved by others are copyright (c) 2018, donald pierce. 


Class Warfare: Who’s Running What at the 2018 Le Mans Race

Nightshift Sports
Embed from Getty Images
The Golden Season of Classic Sports: Le Mans 2018

The 2018 edition of The 24 Hours of Le Mans is on now. If you’re new to FIA/WEC sports car racing (Le Mans is the centerpiece race, but they run an entire schedule of races throughout the year), here’s a compact breakdown of the classes that will be competing this year at The 24.

LMP1

The big dogs run in LMP1 (although some very sharp big dogs have entered LMP2–see below–in years past and challenged for the win). LMP1 cars are pure racing vehicles, with no road-going pretensions whatsoever. The rules for the class are complex, but there are two divisions within the class: hybrid and non-hybrid. The hybrid cars are the most powerful cars in the race; this year’s top hybrids include the favored Toyota TSo50 Hybrid. Porsche and Audi have left the class to concentrate on other areas of interest and Peugeot, another top contender, exited in 2012. But–despite racing against only privateer cars (no other manufacturer is entered in the class), Toyota will have its hands full trying to bring home a victory. You can read about Toyota’s “curse” in this fine article from the New York Times.   

This is a pros only category, in every area from management to driving.  The eams take the race very seriously; Toyota has two time F1 world champion Fernando Alonso driving for the team.

LMP2

If you want to race at Le Mans in a prototype, but don’t want to spend hundreds of millions to do so, you can run in LMP2. LMP2 is like one-design racing in sailboat competition; there are only four chassis manufacturers (Oreca, Onroak Automotive, Dallara, and Riley-Multimatic and one engine producer (Gibson). The objective is to reduce the cost of racing and provide a level playing field for all the contests. There are both pro and amateur drivers in this category.

LMGTE PRO

You will recognize the competitors in this class: Aston Martin, Porsche, Corvette, BMW, Ford and Ferrari. The cars are, of course, heavily modified from stock, but they are built on production models and you could–with the right factory connections–buy one and race it yourself. Not an inexpensive pursuit (allocate $1.5 to $2.2 million to bring a one car team to Le Mans for the race) but LMGTE Pro is now where the factories meet and battle it out. Both Porsche and Ford have entered four cars for this year’s race (strength in numbers is not a bad strategy in a race built on attrition) but there are always surprises–last year, Aston edged out Corvette for the class win on the last lap. One other important point: the drivers in this category are all pros.

LMGTE Am

This is a GT-spec class primarily populated by amateur drivers (at least one, and typically two) and one pro driver. Again, you will recognize the brands. The teams are privateers, although you can be assured they receive ( and pay for ) lots of help from the factory group that produced their race car. This is the category for “gentlemen drivers”, a phrase that reminds some of the less professional, more relaxed years of motor racing, when it did not cost hundreds of millions of dollars to contend for the overall win at Le Mans. Two new models will debut at Le Mans in this class, the new Aston Martin Vantage and BMW’s new M8. A very interesting class for the casual Le Mans fan to follow.

For a more precise definition of the four classes at Le Mans, click this link to the organizers explanation. 

The Fine Print: Images/embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the entire photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. We thank them for sharing. No photographs have been altered. Nightshift Sports is produced by Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker exclusively for The Nightshift (the world news daily). All rights not expressly reserved by others are copyright (c) 2018, donald pierce. 


How To Watch the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans

Nightshift Sports: 

The Golden Season of Classic Sports: Le Mans 2018
Embed from Getty Images

The 24 Hours of Le Mans is Saturday, 16 June 2017.

The race start is  9 a.m. ET (that’s 3PM in France) Saturday and the race finish is 9 a.m. ET Sunday.

The race is broadcast live this year on Velocity, the cable/streaming channel. Fox Sports covered the race in 2017 (with a very chaotic schedule) has passed on it for 2018 (Fox is covering the U.S. Open golf tournament AND the World Cup…they’re busy).

Here are your viewing options:

Dates:

Saturday, June 16th-Sunday June 17th

Racetrack

The race is broadcast from the Circuit de la Sarthe in Le Mans, France

Time:

9:00 a.m. ET Saturday, June 16 – 9 a.m. ET Sunday, June 17

TV:

Velocity

Streaming:

Motor Trend (Onboard Cameras), Streaming Services That Carry Velocity

The 24 Hours of Le Mans is on this weekend–are you ready for a sports car allnighter?

Following the 24 Hours of Le Mans Via Online Text Updates

Official 24 Hours of Le Mans Site 

Motorsports.com

That should keep you in touch and ready to go…..


Nightshift Sports: 2018 U.S.Open, Third Round

The Golden Season of Classic Sports: U.S.Open 2018
Embed from Getty Images

The first two rounds of the U.S. Open are in the record books and there was havoc on the course. Reeling from criticism over last year’s U.S.Open course–the winner, Brooks Koepka was 16 under par at the Erin Hills course–the USGA, which stages/operates the U.S.Open decided that it would not happen again and for the 2018 version of the U.S.Open, they set the course up as a very severe challenge to accuracy and appropriate shot selection. Set this year at Shinnecock Hills, on Long Island (just outside of New York City), the course feature rough that was very rough. Gone was the opportunity to easily play out of the rough if a player didn’t hit the fairway; instead, players were put into the situation of spending precious minutes looking for balls that were buried deep in the high-cut rough and then hoping they could a good shot and hit the ball clear.

And then there was the weather to contend with. Forecasts prior to the start of the race predicted a hot weekend, with plenty of sun and temperatures in the high 80s. That’s not exactly what happened in the first two rounds.

Thursday was a very high wind day; Friday was the rain. The weather had a massive impact on the players ability to score–or so most of them would say–and the result was an abysmal showing for some of the best players in the world. A +10 first round was rather normal.

Even though the cut for the tournament was set at +8, some of the most popular and best players  in the sport were sent home after Friday’s round.  Among them: Jordan Speith, Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, Bubba Watson, Jason Day, John Rahm, Adam Scott and Sergio Garcia.  World class, highly accomplished, very formidable, all of them. And out. All of them.

So “moving day” finds a very short leaderboard, lead by Dustin Johnson, who is 3 under par and four in front of his closet competitors, Charley Hoffman and Scott Pierce (b0th even par). And yes, fan favorite Phil Mickelson is still in the game, at +6 starting today’s play (Left does know how to compete).

Who knows what today’s round will bring? Stay up to date with our click-pak (below) of information. resources, and coverage for today’s play.

Results, information, and resources to enhance your enjoyment of the The U.S. Open. The third round is now in progress.

Current Leaderboard

New York Times Coverage

Washington Post Coverage

How to Watch The US Open

US Open Radio

USGA

 

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at GettyImages.com, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not be altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. Nightshift Sports is produced by Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker . Thanks guys! All rights not expressly reserved by others are copyright (c) 2018, donald pierce. Thanks for reading.