The Nightshift: 2 September 2017

 

Press Clippings:
Embed from Getty Images
Good Morning, it’s Saturday, 2 September 2017 and this is the morning edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

There has never been a storm like Hurricane Harvey. Estimates of up to 180,000 homes damaged by Harvey; 19 trillion gallons of rain (Source: USA Today); 9400 commercial flights cancelled; 300,000-500,000 cars destroyed, with the end total perhaps as many as 1,000,000 cars (Source: USA today). It is a disaster on a scale the U.S. has never seen before and the recovery is going to be one of the biggest challenges in U.S. history. Hang in there, Houston. Keep moving forward.

College football season starts today, hopefully a providing a few hours of needed diversion for affected Texas/Louisiana football fans before going back to the round-the-clock efforts to recover. Even if it’s only for an afternoon or an evening,  it’s a much-needed break for some.

Today is National Tailgating Day. If you can get out to the game and tailgate, it’s a very good day.

Safe safe, stay dry, and help one other person today.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

Channel 2 Houston (KPRC-TV/NBC)

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1346 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.


The Nightshift: 1 September 2017

 

Press Clippings:
Embed from Getty Images
Good Morning, it’s Friday, 1 September 2017, and this is the morning edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

Hurricane Harvey continues to dominate the news. Houston is drying out and water is receding–in some areas. The recovery and repair process will be long, painful, and expensive. Lots of charities have been created to help the city; most notable is JJ Watt (Houston Texan’s NFL football player) who started a small fund for donations with a goal of reaching $250,000 and has now topped $13.0 million. Texans and American continue to help as money, volunteers, and supplies pour into the city.

Next big worry: gasoline supplies. The hurricane shut down gasoline refineries along the gulf coast. Gas stations are running out of fuel, prices are spiking, and the national Labor Day weekend is upon us (lots of demand for gasoline). Authorities say that refineries are being re-started and supplies will be available, but it will take a while to “normalize”–maybe as much as a month.

Today is National Food Bank Day (Donate, please). It’s also National No Rhyme (Nor Reason) Day, for which we have no explanation.

Safe safe, stay dry, and help one person today.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

Channel 2 Houston (KPRC-TV/NBC)

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1345 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.


Stormwatch: Government Assistance

The Latest Word

Hurricane Harvey is a devastating event. Everyone is going to need assistance to recover. One of the very best places to start is to use the government resources available to you. Here’s where to go for help:

Federal Government Assistance

or call

1-800-621-FEMA

Hang in there. We’ll get through it.

 


The Nightshift: 31 August 2017

 

Press Clippings:

Good Morning, it’s Thursday, 31 August 2017, and this is the morning edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

The damage from Hurricane Harvey continues. In Houston, rescue operations continue. To the east, there is flooding in Beaumont and Port Arthur and into Louisiana. Helicopters are crowding the sky (the airspace has been cleared of non-emergency traffic) as rescue missions continue. Donations are pouringin into the state from all over America.The entire Texas National Guard (12,000 people) has been mobilized to help and another 10,000 National Guard troops are coming to help from surrounding states. Water is slowly receding but the real impact will not be known for months or perhaps years.

Today is National South Carolina Day. Beach music anyone? (yes..it is 31 August..yesterday was a different National Day..)

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

Channel 2 Houston (KPRC-TV/NBC)

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1345 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.


The Nightshift: 30 August 2017

Editor’s Note: If you’re reading this site, you’re a follower of the news, and the biggests story in America this week has been Hurricane Harvey, a storm that dumped an unprecedented amount of rain on Texas, in particular, on Houston and Harris County. The Media Bunker managed to get through Days 1-5 of Harvey without sustaining flooding, but on Day 6, the possibility of flooding at The Media Bunker became very real. After a short discussion, the decision has made to relocate (or evacuate, depending upon your point of view) until things settled down, one way or the other. That move pushed everything back including publishing deadlines. We apologize for the inconvenience. 

 

Press Clippings:
Embed from Getty Images

Good Evening, its Wednesday 30 August 2017, and this is the evening edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

Hurricane Harvey continued to slap Houston (and Harris County, Texas) around yesterday and today. Flooding is slowing–a little–but new flood threats arose when two key reservoirs that hold rain and protect huge areas of residential developments from floodwaters, starting to release water to relieve pressure on the dam and, in the process, project flooding threats into areas that had not previously been flooded. It is a serious drama. Harvey also blew into Southeast Texas and Louisiana after drifting out to sea, reorganizing a bit, and then coming ashore close to Beaumont and later continuing to move east into Louisiana, where the storm characteristically dropped massive amounts of rain. Will this thing ever stop?

Today is National Toasted Marshmallow Day. Where are the skewers?

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

Channel 2 Houston (KPRC-TV/NBC)

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1344 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.


Stormwatch: Latest Red Cross Infomation Update for Hurricane Harvey

The Latest Word:

Specific information for volunteers and people affected by Hurricane Harvey can be found at the Red Cross Site. 

Stay safe and stay dry. Don’t go out unless you have to.

 


The Nightshift: 29 August 2017

Press Clippings:
Embed from Getty Images
Good Morning, it’s Tuesday, 29 August 2017, and this is the morning edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

The rain from Hurricane Harvey will not stop; Houston is right in the midst of all the rainfall and no break is in sight. The city continues to flood and rain continued overnight. Now the city is faced with a decision requiring the release of water from holding reservoirs; that release will most likely flood areas that were not previously flooded. President Trump will tour the point of landfall for Hurricane Harvey, visiting Corpus Christi today. The hope is that Harvey will soon move far offshore and out of the area. Link to local tv station (KPRC-TV, NBC) below. Link to National Weather Service below. Hurricane Harvey has done the unthinkable as a storm, stay informed. Everyday is unprecedented.

Today is National Chop Suey Day. Are you good with chopsticks?

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

Channel 2 Houston (KPRC-TV/NBC)

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1342 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.


Stormwatch: How Hurricane Harvey Rewrote the Rules of The Storm Cycle

Editors Note: When we started Stormwatch (as a subset of The Nightshift) to cover Hurricane Harvey,  we noted that coverage would continue as long as the storm was present and power was available. Since then (Friday) we lost power, the storm came–and stayed–and then we managed to regain power, so Stormwatch will continue to chronicle the unprecedented weather event that is Hurricane Harvey. If you’re affected by the storm–we wish you good luck and urge you to be safe.  Harvey just doesn’t want to leave the area and that’s a problem. Read on. 

The Latest Word: 
Embed from Getty Images
(Houston, Texas 28 August 2017)

Those who live along the coast and in areas that are susceptible to hurricanes know about the cycle of such storms. They have a pattern, and while knowing the pattern doesn’t relieve any of the effects of the storm, it does provide a certain level of understanding about what’s happening and where, precisely, the hurricane is in it’s cycle of destruction.

  1. A storm is forming. The weather forecasting projects the formation of a weather event, beginning with conditions that could create a “tropical storm”. As the weather conditions organize, the tropical storm gathers itself up, gets a name and Tropical Storm designation, and then–if it continues to grow– reaches Hurricane designation (i.e. winds above 75MPH).
  2. Projected Path. The weather forecasters get on it and start projecting paths for the new weather event. This typically starts at the National Weather Service, but very quickly, the local weather teams from TV and radio stations pick up coverage. At this stage, there are a lot of different paths for the storm to go, so everything is a combination of best projection/guess. This stage will include not only the path (projected) of the storm but the timeline. Tensions are raised, preparations start for those in the projected path of the storm.
  3. Landfall Projection. Time passes, the projections from various sources (European Model, HRRR, etc.) converge and some type of general agreement is reached about a most likely projection for landfall in terms of geography and timing. Those who have not yet gone to the store to refresh their supplies, get water and batteries, and stock up to “ride out the storm”, converge on grocery stores, Walmarts, Costco, and every outlet that has provisions. Within a day, shelves of key supplies become empty. Resupplies are generally unpredictable. Media outlets stage units, reporters, cameramen in the general area to cover the event. TV Coverage ramps up. Networks send reporting teams into the area.
  4. Landfall. The storm is now focused and the landfall projection is agreed. Media coverage ramps up yet again as announcers and reporting teams venture out into the face of the storm to provide coverage (i.e. newscasters leaning into blinding rain and wind). Inside the direct storm area, if residents have not evacuated, they are sheltering in place. The landfall is covered via every form of media and the broadcasting/news is continuous. The fury of the storm hits, the wind blows signs and trees and tower poles down, rain comes down in torrential sheets. Horrific stories abound. It doesn’t sound good or look good.
  5. The Eye. The storm slams into the landing area and the winds and rain do all kinds of damage. Tornados spring up (typically in daylight landfall). And then–the eye of the hurricane passes over the landfall area, it becomes quiet, the storm abates. But it’s only a brief respite, and then the second part of the storm hits, the “other side” of the eye and continues to damage the area. And then, it moves over the affected area.
  6. The Storm Passes.  Depending upon ground speed, the storm does it damage and moves further inland. The further from the ocean it moves, the less power it packs (theoretically). As it goes further from the point of landfall, the storm dissipates (theoretically) in fury. The faster the storm moves, the sooner the process of cleanup, recovery, rescue, and rebuilding can begin.There is a sign of relief from those who survived the hurricane landfall without severe damage and a sigh of sorrow from those who were hit hard and suffered destruction. But–it’s over. The storm has passed, now the clean up can begin. The cycle is complete. For this hurricane.

But this time, Hurricane Harvey rewrote the cycle and the rules. Nature is like that–unpredictable, mercurial, not prone to following rules. It did follow the typical, traditional path for a hurricane weather event–at least stages 1-5.

It did not pay attention to Stage 6 and keep moving out of the area.

Harvey has decided to linger. It has a very slow groundspeed (between 2-10MPH throughout the storm period) and continues to drop rain across the area. Especially hard hit is Houston, where rain continues to come down in torrents, with only slight relief. The city is flooded out as a result of the relentless rain. By now, the storm should have passed through and the destructive capacity of the storm (wind, rain), should have degraded.

It hasn’t happened.

There has even been some suggestion that Harvey will go back into the Gulf, regain strength, and then come back onshore again, this time further up the coast (i.e. Houston) than where it first went ashore (Corpus Christi area).

The length of time that Harvey has stayed in the area and the sheer amount of rainfall it has produced has overwhelmed the City of Houston, which traditionally has issues with flooding during big rainstorms and hurricanes. With Harvey, there has been no relief. It is the storm that will not relent, the storm that will not leave, the storm that will not dissipate.

Football games have halftimes. There’s a break in between rounds in a championship fight. Even in warfare, generals stage campaigns and assaults with planning for re-supplying and resting the troops, re-gathering resources, re-setting how to proceed. But there is no rest in the battle against Hurricane Harvey. The storm will not follow the rules, won’t give the area a break, and the level of attrition from just the sheer fatigue of dealing with continuous weather attacks(from the air) and water intrusion (from the ground) is wearing the city and its’ people down. It has to stop. There has to be a respite, soon. The extended nature of the severe weather event is taking a massive toll, because there’s time for relief or respite.

There is no precedent to a storm like Hurricane Harvey  but that makes no difference to the people and the area. The rules of the hurricane storm cycle have been changed and now everyone suffers.

Longer.

 

The Fine Print: Image embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. The image has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. Stormwatch is produced by Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. Stay safe and stay dry. 

 

 


Stormwatch: The Evacuation Checklist

The Latest Word

This is not a pleasant post to write, but it’s a necessary one. There are a lot of evacuations going on in Houston and while we hope that you do not face an evacuation necessity, maybe you know someone who is and could use some guidance in what to take. Here are some sources for you to check out.

The Survival Mom Checklist

HouseLogic Evacuation Checklist (made possible by REALTORS)

Dick Oakes Evacuation Checklist

Parents Partner Checklist

OSHA Workplace Evacuation Checklist

Red Cross Hurricane Evacuation Checklist

Ready.Gov Evacuation Checklist

Hurricane Supply List (From USCG)

The hope is that no one needs this information immediately–that would imply a very difficult set of choices–but if you do, it’s a click away. And if you do not need immediately, you need to pay attention to immediately, just in case–God forbid–sometime in the future, you need to get out in a hurry.

The Boy Scouts said it best: Be Prepared.

 

The Fine Print:  Stormwatch is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. 

 

 

 


The Nightshift: 28 August 2017

Embed from Getty Images

Press Clippings:

Good Morning, it’s Monday, 27 August 2017, and this is the morning edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

Hurricane Harvey has flooded out the city of Houston. It’s now Venice on the Gulf, with major highways and streets flooded and a local TV station asking for anyone with a boat to help get employees to the station. Addicks Dam/Reservoir is releasing water because the Army Corps of Engineers–think Hurricane Katrina–is worried the dam will break. The result will be the flooding of up to a thousand homes in the area. Local TV is wall-to-wall with storm coverage and the whole situation is terrifying. No one is left unscathed by yet another “storm of the century”. Are the centuries getting shorter? Or have we finally done it to ourselves with the climate changes? Weather Channel link below. Houston local TV link below. Stay safe if you’re in Houston.

Today is National Cherry Turnovers Day.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

Channel 2 Houston (KPRC-TV/NBC)

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1339 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.