The Nightshift: 27 August 2017

Editor’s Note: Hurricane Harvey has blown into Texas and hit with unprecedented force. In addition to flooding in all parts of Texas, it also knocked out the power to The Media Bunker, so things are running late today and will probably run late tonight and tomorrow and maybe Tuesday. Who knows. Harvey was one of those “100 year events”, which seem to come a lot more frequently than they came in the past. More on this via our special series on Harvey, Stormwatch. 

Press Clippings:
Embed from Getty Images
Good Morning, it’s Sunday afternoon, 27 August 2017, and this is the afternoon edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

Hurricane Harvey has brought death, destruction, flooding, power outages, and a massive disruption of life into Texas. As of this post, it’s still going strong, dropping up to four inches of rain an hour on some parts of the state–Houston in particular. If you’re in the storm area, heed the advice of the pros: stay safe, don’t move, don’t get on the roads, and wait for the storm and its effects to recede. The sun will come out again; be sure you’re here to see it. A link to The Weather Channel is at the bottom of the Nightshift Newspapers list (below).

Today is National Just Because Day….and why? Just Because.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

 

The Fine Print: The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1338 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.


The Nightshift: 26 August 2017

Press Clippings:

Embed from Getty Images

Good Morning, it’s Saturday, 26 August 2017, and this is the morning edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

Tropical Storm Harvey has hit the state of Texas very hard, coming ashore in the Corpus Christi area between Port Aransas and Port O’Connor. Heavy wind damage, lots of power outages, storm surge, etc. The strongest storm in the last 50 years and it’s showing its power. A link to the Weather Channel is at the bottom of the press list(below). You can see our coverage of  the storm by clicking here (scroll up for most recent posts…posting will continue throughout the day). If you’re in the storm or the path of the storm–stay safe and off the roads.

Today is National Dog Day. If you have a pup, show him/her some extra affection today. They’d do the same for you.

Stay in the know: catch up on the news around the globe by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest Newspapers.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

 

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st century on file. This photo has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing. The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1336 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.


Stormwatch: Open Road Policy

The Last Word:

I10 in Houston at sunset, a couple of hours before Harvey was scheduled to hit land. Relatively deserted.

When big storms hit, the roads empty. When Hurricane Harvey was still two hours offshore, the major roads were Houston had very, very little traffic. Usually on a Friday night, the streets are packed. But not this Friday night. Harvey was making his presence felt.


Stormwatch: Building Up

August 25, 2017, 9:25 AM.The national take on Hurricane Harvey as the projected path becomes more tightly defined.

The dimensions and slow pace of the storm are becoming clearer. At this stage, Harvey is still Cat 2. But that would change later in the day.

The Fine Print: Screenshot of Weather Channel, 25 August 2017, taken with Apple iPhone 6.  Stormwatch is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. Contents Copyright (c) 2017, Donald Pierce.

 


Stormwatch: Shelf Life

The Latest Word:

One of the ways you know it’s a serious storm is by what you can’t get easily anymore. Like Water. Or Ramen Noodles. Or fruit. Or bread. Or Water.

Fruit? No Fruit. All gone. The supply is depleted. Maybe later in the week.

read. Or water.

Water. You want water? We ain’t got no stinking water.

 

Bread? You want bread. No Bread. No bread on the way. No.No. All gone

Milk….not possible. No milk. You should have been here on Wednesday if you want milk.

Got bad news if you want want Ramen noodles. No Ramen. All gone. But..if you don’t have any water, why would you need noodles?

Not even Wal-Mart, with its legendary inventory management delivery system can keep up with the demand for water…


Stormwatch: Hurricane Resource List

The Latest Word:
Embed from Getty Images
If you want to follow the storm–or if you’re like me and lots of others and will stay up late tonight tracking it–here are some resources for you.

Television Coverage:

The Weather Channel.

CNN

Fox News

BBC

Also check your local stations especially if you are located in Texas.

Internet Sources:

National Weather Service 

The Weather Channel

Accuweather

Intellicast

Five Best Weather Sites (LifeHacker)

National and International Newspaper Coverage

You only need to go to The Nightshift, our roundup of the best newspapers in the world, all accessible with a single click.

Research

Hurricane Carla

Hurricane Hunters

Hurricane Hunters Background 

What do hurricane numbers mean

The Hurricane Rating Scale Explained

Twitter

America’s most immediate news source. Sign in to Twitter and search for Hurricane Harvey..the feed will start immediately.

 
The Fine Print:  Embed courtesy of our friends at Getty Images, who have the photographic history of the 20th and 21st Century on file. The image has not been altered in any way. We thank them for sharing.  Storm Watch is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker.


Storm Watch: Rising Tides

The Latest Word:

25 August 2017, 9:17AM Britta Merwin of Channel 2 Houston (NBC) sets the stage for Hurricane Harvey’s arrival on the Texas coast.

During the Stormwatch, we took screen shots of the Weather Channel and local coverage of Hurricane Harvey. Everything was time stamped, so seen as a sequence, it provides a visual timeline of Hurricane Harvey as it closed in on the Texas coast. If you read the text on the screen carefully, you can see how the storm’s characteristics changed over time. Stay tuned. Many more to come.

 

 

The Fine Print: Screenshot of Channel 2, KPRC-TV (Houston NBC) taken at  9:17AM, 25 August 2017, with Apple iPhone 6.  Stormwatch is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. Contents Copyright (c) 2017, Donald Pierce.

 


 


Stormwatch: Dan Rather Makes Weather History

The Latest Word: 

On September 11th,  1961, a young Houston news director, Dan Rather, of KHOU-TV (Channel 11), made television weather history with his coverage of Hurricane Carla.

Rather risked his life to provide coverage of Carla to Houston viewers. The storm was monstrous, a Category 5 hurricane, with winds of up to 175MPH. The embed video tells the story and what an impact it had on television coverage of major storms. Rather’s bravery and coverage certainly received national notice; a year later, 1962, he joined CBS News.  Ultimately, he inherited the anchor’s chair on the CBS Evening News–the seat formerly occupied by Walter Cronkite.

The heir to Rather’s legacy is Jim Cantore of The Weather Channel, who has been known to put himself right in the middle of every big weather event and is known for his toughness and precise coverage of events. Over the last decade, Cantore has become a bit of a legend himself–and deservedly so.

But it all started with one storm and one newscaster: Hurricane Carla and Dan Rather.

The Fine Print: Embed courtesy of our friends at YouTube (don’t forget to check out their new streaming TV service, YouTubeTV). All rights reserved by their respective parties. We thank them for sharing this important documentary. Stormwatch is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. Contents Copyright (c)2017, Donald Pierce, except for those rights specifically reserved or granted to others. 


Stormwatch: Hurricane Harvey Winds Up

The Latest Word: 

The 9:00AM telecast from the Weather Channel, 25 August 2017.

And so it begins. There is some debate about which buildup for Hurricane Harvey is biggest: the storm itself or the media coverage.

If you watch The Weather Channel–which is doing an excellent job–you will receive the impression that this thing, Harvey, is an absolute freak of nature and one of the worst storms of all time. The major hope among those who are in the area which will be affected by the storm is that the weathercasters are wrong…that the storm will not live up to its’ billing, that it will not reach maximum force, won’t hang around for days and drop feet of rain on a part of the country that doesn’t handle massive rain well and is flat and full of hard surfaces and concrete and prone to flash floods and that in a day or so it will all, literally,  blow over.

Harvey has other ideas. In the last  12 hours, the storm has grown from Cat 2 to Cat 3 to Cat 4 (let’s hope it stops there) and is now bearing down on Corpus Christi and tossing wind at high speeds in every direction. In other words, it’s ugly and it’s going to get uglier.

It is, under the circumstances that are materializing, not quite right to be critical of the weather forecasters and weather channels for scaring us.

Looks like–regrettably–they were right.

An extra push of adrenaline fueled fear is sometimes what is required to get people up and moving.

If one life or two or twenty-five is saved because people took them–the weathermen and women–at their word and got in gear and stocked up or–if in the path–got out of dodge, then that’s a job well done. The coverage now, in the evening, is almost continuous on local stations and is continuous on the cable and internet weather channels. It’s a real life drama with unpredictable twists and turns and it’s riveting.

There are other elements at play here.

This is Emmy time. This is breakout on the national media scene time. This event and these moments are the ones that push weather and news people and TV producers into national prominence and make careers and win awards. It’s national news but it’s on your turf–get out there, lean into the wind, deliver the report and get it all on tape. Destiny is calling.

There is a precedent:  during Hurricane Carla in 1961, one such breakout occurred and it turned local newscaster Dan Rather into first a CBS news reporter and then the anchorman for the CBS Evening News. On the strength of his performance in the wind and pressure of Hurricane Carla.

Hurricane Harvey is winding up. Stormwatch will provide coverage and commentary until the storm is over or the power goes out–which ever comes first.

 

The Fine Print: Screenshot of The Weather Channel taken at 9:15AM, 25 August 2017, with Apple iPhone 6.  Stormwatch is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. Contents copyright (c) 2017, Donald Pierce.

 

 


The Nightshift: 25 August 2017

 

Storm Watch. The coverage of Hurricane Harvey begins.

Press Clippings: 

Good Morning, it’s Friday, 25 August 2017, and this is the morning edition of The Nightshift, the world’s overnight news feed.

Tropical Storm Harvey is bearing down on the Texas Gulf Coast and is expected to make landfall late Friday night or early Saturday morning near Corpus Christi. The storm is–as of this post–a Category 2 storm and is projected to drop up to 30 inches of rain along the coast. A direct link to the Weather Channel is below.

Today is National Kiss and Make Up Day. Doubt that this day will be highly celebrated in Congress.

Stay in the know: catch up on the news around the globe by reading the front pages of the World’s Greatest Newspapers.

The International Headlines are all at your fingertips, below.

The Times (London

Financial Times (UK)

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland)

The Wall Street Journal (European edition)

Washington Post (Washington, D.C.)

New York Times (New York)

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles)

Daily News Egypt (Cairo)

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong)

The Moscow Times (Moscow)

Le Figaro (Paris)

Bloomberg.com (New York)

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem)

The Japanese Times (Tokyo)

Sputnik (Moscow)

The Buenas Aires Herald (Buenas Aires)

The Sidney Morning Herald (Sidney)

Deadline Hollywood (Hollywood)

FiveThirtyEight (New York City)

Politico (Washington, DC)

Lawfareblog (Washington, DC)

Wired (San Francisco, CA)

The Weather Channel 

 

The Fine Print:  Embed is courtesy of The Media Bunker and is a screen shot of The Weather Channel.   The Nightshift is a production of Perception Engineering and The Media Bunker. This post is number 1327 for this site. The Nightshift is a continually evolving experiment in news communications. Currently, comments on the world’s news have been (severely) limited and a photo of one important story of the day is included. It’s rapid iteration. Thanks for reading. Now–catch up on the world.